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Today's Highlights
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Today's news headlines from the sources selected by our team:

Corporations are Driving the Energy Revolution (Op-Ed)
When even Walmart can't buy as much green energy as it wants, there's a problem.
LiveScience.com, Fri, 25 Jul 2014 06:17:48 GMT

Why Do We Care So Much About El NiƱo?
The obsessive attention to the state of the latest El NiƱo comes from the major global impacts it can have.
LiveScience.com, Fri, 25 Jul 2014 06:17:48 GMT

Erectile Dysfunction in Military Males Is Triple the Norm
Young men in the U.S. military are more likely to have erectile dysfunction than their civilian counterparts, but few military men get treatment, according to a new study.
LiveScience.com, Fri, 25 Jul 2014 06:17:48 GMT

Monitoring the rise and fall of the microbiome
Trillions of bacteria live in each person's digestive tract. Scientists believe that some of these bacteria help digest food and stave off harmful infections, but their role in human health is not well understood.
Medical Xpress - spotlight medical and health news stories, Fri, 25 Jul 2014 06:09:58 GMT

Brain's dynamic duel underlies win-win choices
People choosing between two or more equally positive outcomes experience paradoxical feelings of pleasure and anxiety, feelings associated with activity in different regions of the brain, according to research led by Amitai Shenhav, an associate research scholar at the Princeton Neuroscience Institute at Princeton University.
Medical Xpress - spotlight medical and health news stories, Fri, 25 Jul 2014 06:09:58 GMT

Link between ritual circumcision procedure and herpes infection in infants examined
A rare procedure occasionally performed during Jewish circumcisions that involves direct oral suction is a likely source of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) transmissions documented in infants between 1988 and 2012, a literature review conducted by Penn Medicine researchers and published online in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Disease Society found. The reviewers, from Penn's Center for Evidence-based Practice, identified 30 reported cases in New York, Canada and Israel.
Medical Xpress - spotlight medical and health news stories, Fri, 25 Jul 2014 06:09:58 GMT

Wildlife loss link to child slavery
New research suggests that the global reduction in wildlife is connected to an increase in human trafficking and child slavery.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Fri, 25 Jul 2014 06:17:48 GMT

'Fluffy' dinosaurs were widespread
A discovery of 150 million year old fossils in Siberia indicates that feathers were much more widespread among dinosaurs than previously thought.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Fri, 25 Jul 2014 06:17:48 GMT

Africa 'needs green revolution'
Sub-Saharan Africa's agricultural sector needs to harvest the fruits of biotechnology in order to establish sustainable development, says a Chatham House report.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Fri, 25 Jul 2014 06:17:48 GMT

Earlier Stone Age artifacts found in Northern Cape of South Africa
Excavations at an archaeological site at Kathu in the Northern Cape province of South Africa have produced tens of thousands of Earlier Stone Age artifacts, including hand axes and other tools.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Fri, 25 Jul 2014 06:17:48 GMT

Parched West is using up underground water: Study points to grave implications for Western U.S. water supply
A new study finds more than 75 percent of the water loss in the drought-stricken Colorado River Basin since late 2004 came from underground resources. The extent of groundwater loss may pose a greater threat to the water supply of the western United States than previously thought.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Fri, 25 Jul 2014 06:17:48 GMT

Biologist warn of early stages of Earth's 6th mass extinction event
The planet's current biodiversity, the product of 3.5 billion years of evolutionary trial and error, is the highest in the history of life. But it may be reaching a tipping point. Scientists caution that the loss and decline of animals is contributing to what appears to be the early days of the planet's sixth mass biological extinction event. Since 1500, more than 320 terrestrial vertebrates have become extinct. Populations of the remaining species show a 25 percent average decline in abundance. The situation is similarly dire for invertebrate animal life.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Fri, 25 Jul 2014 06:17:48 GMT

Four billion-year-old chemistry in cells today?
Some of the chemical processes that first gave rise to life may be still at work in living cells.
World Science, Fri, 25 Jul 2014 05:49:30 GMT

Study: We could detect aliens by their pollution
Research suggests we could spot the fingerprints of certain common pollutants.
World Science, Fri, 25 Jul 2014 05:49:30 GMT

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