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Today's Highlights
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Today's news headlines from the sources selected by our team:

Can Octopuses be Cultivated for Food?
As the world’s supply of fish diminishes while the number of humans keeps increasing, it seems these creatures would make an ideal mass-produced food for our hungry mouths.
LiveScience.com, Mon, 01 Sep 2014 19:54:57 GMT

Google Must Make Android Safer (Op-Ed)
Over the past few months, the Android platform developed by Google and based on the Linux operating system has been having a difficult time.
LiveScience.com, Mon, 01 Sep 2014 19:54:57 GMT

No, Your IQ is Not Fixed for Life (Op-Ed)
We’re getting more stupid.
LiveScience.com, Mon, 01 Sep 2014 19:54:57 GMT

Location of body fat can increase hypertension risk
People with fat around their abdominal area are at greater risk of developing hypertension when compared to those with similar body mass index but fat concentrations elsewhere on the body, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
Medical Xpress - spotlight medical and health news stories, Mon, 01 Sep 2014 19:54:58 GMT

New diagnosis technique to counter rapid rise in knee replacements
A new study from researchers at the University has identified a more accurate computerised method that will improve the success of knee replacements, and prevent costly, often unnecessary revisions to existing surgical implants.
Medical Xpress - spotlight medical and health news stories, Mon, 01 Sep 2014 19:54:58 GMT

Training your brain to prefer healthy foods
It may be possible to train the brain to prefer healthy low-calorie foods over unhealthy higher-calorie foods, according to new research by scientists at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (USDA HNRCA) at Tufts University and at Massachusetts General Hospital. Published online today in the journal Nutrition & Diabetes, a brain scan study in adult men and women suggests that it is possible to reverse the addictive power of unhealthy food while also increasing preference for healthy foods.
Medical Xpress - spotlight medical and health news stories, Mon, 01 Sep 2014 19:54:58 GMT

Xenon and argon banned for athletes
Doping experts have yet to find an effective test to uncover athletes using the gases xenon and argon to boost performance, as a ban is introduced.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Mon, 01 Sep 2014 19:54:58 GMT

African food security on the menu
African ministers and business leaders gather in Ethiopia to consider ways to trigger a green revolution and improve the continent's food security.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Mon, 01 Sep 2014 19:54:58 GMT

Antarctic waters 'rising faster'
Melting ice is fuelling sea-level rise around the coast of Antarctica, a new report finds.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Mon, 01 Sep 2014 19:54:58 GMT

New way to diagnose malaria by detecting parasite's waste in infected blood cells
A technique that can detect malarial parasite's waste in infected blood cells has been developed by researchers. "There is real potential to make this into a field-deployable system, especially since you don't need any kind of labels or dye. It's based on a naturally occurring biomarker that does not require any biochemical processing of samples" says one of the senior authors of a paper.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Mon, 01 Sep 2014 20:24:53 GMT

Why sibling stars look alike: Early, fast mixing in star-birth clouds
Early, fast, turbulent mixing of gas within giant molecular clouds -- the birthplaces of stars -- means all stars formed from a single cloud bear the same unique chemical 'tag' or 'DNA fingerprint,' write astrophysicists. Could such chemical tags help astronomers identify our own Sun's long-lost sibling stars?
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Mon, 01 Sep 2014 20:24:53 GMT

Memory in silent neurons: How do unconnected neurons communicate?
According to a generally-accepted model of synaptic plasticity, a neuron that communicates with others of the same kind emits an electrical impulse as well as activating its synapses transiently. This electrical pulse, combined with the signal received from other neurons, acts to stimulate the synapses. How is it that some neurons are caught up in the communication interplay even when they are barely connected? This is the chicken-or-egg puzzle of synaptic plasticity that a team is aiming to solve.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Mon, 01 Sep 2014 20:24:53 GMT

Tiny "cannon" shoots single light particles
The invention is part of an attempt to develop super-fast computers using photons.
World Science, Mon, 01 Sep 2014 20:49:17 GMT

Sheepdogs found to use simple rules to herd sheep
Sscientists used GPS technology to understand how sheepdogs do their jobs so well.
World Science, Mon, 01 Sep 2014 20:49:17 GMT

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