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Today's Highlights
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Today's news headlines from the sources selected by our team:

Revenge Is Bittersweet, Research Finds
Revenge inspires both positive and negative emotions in people, bolstering the notion that vengeance is bittersweet, new research suggests.
Live Science, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 16:13:03 GMT

Gut Microbes Could Lead Fight Against Superbugs
Microorganisms live and thrive throughout your body, and as strange as it may sound, scientists have found that these microbes are vital to your health.
Live Science, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 16:13:03 GMT

Infant Cadavers Were Prized by Victorian Anatomists
Victorian doctors and medical students seeking to understand how human bodies worked in life gained many of their insights by studying them in death.
Live Science, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 16:13:03 GMT

'Healing' detected in Antarctic ozone hole
Researchers say they have found the first clear evidence that the thinning in the ozone layer above Antarctica is starting to heal.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 16:13:03 GMT

Late scientist Tom Kibble wins award for particle work
Prof Sir Tom Kibble is posthumously awarded the highest UK honour for physics.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 16:13:03 GMT

Call to assure status of EU scientists in UK post-Brexit
The president of the Royal Society calls on the government to guarantee the residency of EU citizens in the UK.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 16:13:03 GMT

Key difference in immune cells may explain children's increased susceptibility to illness
Schools are commonly known as breeding grounds for viruses and bacteria, but this may not necessarily be linked to hygiene. New research in mice shows that because their immune systems do not operate at the same efficiency as adults, children may not only be more likely to contract a viral infection, but they also take to longer clear it. Specifically, the study examined how CD4 T-cells (immune cells that play a key role in fighting viral infections) respond to influenza, and found that children's immune systems may not yet be able to make enough antibody molecules to rid their lungs of the influenza virus as quickly as adults. These findings were reported in the July 2016 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology.
Medical Xpress - latest medical and health news stories, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 16:16:25 GMT

Are we giving up on cardiac arrest patients too soon?
Physicians may be drawing conclusions too soon about survival outcomes of patients who suffered a cardiac arrest outside the hospital.
Medical Xpress - latest medical and health news stories, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 16:16:25 GMT

Researchers use gelatin instead of the gym to grow stronger muscles
USC researcher Megan L. McCain and colleagues have devised a way to develop bigger, stronger muscle fibers. But instead of popping up on the bicep of a bodybuilder, these muscles grow on a tiny scaffold or "chip" molded from a type of water-logged gel made from gelatin.
Medical Xpress - latest medical and health news stories, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 16:16:25 GMT

Physicists find missing link between glass formation and crystallization
Glasses are neither fluids nor crystals. They are amorphous solids and one of the big puzzles in condensed matter physics. For decades, the question of how glass forms has been a matter of controversy. Is it because some regions freeze their thermal motion? Or is it because there are particles or clusters which do not fit to form a crystal? At least for the model system of hard spheres, researchers have now taken a major leap in reconciling these two opposing views. Using a clever combination of light scattering and microscopy, they were able to demonstrate that within a melt of hard spheres small compacted regions form comprising a few hundred spheres.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 16:13:03 GMT

Cravings for high-calorie foods may be switched off in the brain by new supplement
Eating a type of powdered food supplement, based on a molecule produced by bacteria in the gut, reduces cravings for high-calorie foods such as chocolate, cake and pizza, a new study suggests. Scientists asked 20 volunteers to consume a milkshake that either contained an ingredient called inulin-propionate ester, or a type of fibre called inulin.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 16:13:03 GMT

Spiderweb galaxy: Watery dew drops surrounding dusty spider’s web
Astronomers have spotted glowing droplets of condensed water in the distant Spiderweb Galaxy -- but not where they expected to find them. Detections show that the water is located far out in the galaxy and therefore cannot be associated with central, dusty, star-forming regions, as previously thought.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 16:13:03 GMT

Dividing T Cells Inherit Uneven Enzyme Activity: A Potential Target for Improving Cancer Immunotherapy
Newswise imageWhen an immune T cell divides into two daughter cells, the activity of an enzyme called mTORC1, which controls protein production, splits unevenly between the progeny, producing two cells with different properties. Such "asymmetric division," uncovered by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers using lab-grown cells and specially bred mice, could offer new ways to enhance cancer immunotherapy and may have other implications for studying how stem cells differentiate.
Newswise: Latest News, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 16:13:03 GMT

Breathing in a Cure: Inhalable Ibuprofen on the Horizon
Newswise imageIbuprofen: You can buy it at any drug store, and it will help with that stabbing headache or sprained ankle. One of the ways it does so is by reducing inflammation, and it is this property that may also help patients with cystic fibrosis.
Newswise: Latest News, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 16:13:03 GMT

New Therapy Treats Autoimmune Disease Without Harming Normal Immunity
Newswise imageIn a study with potentially major implications for the future treatment of autoimmunity and related conditions, scientists have found a way to remove the subset of antibody-making cells that cause an autoimmune disease, without harming the rest of the immune system.
Newswise: Latest News, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 16:13:03 GMT

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