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Today's Highlights
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Today's news headlines from the sources selected by our team:

Ebola Outbreak
The current Ebola outbreak is the largest in history. The three most affected countries are Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, and cases have also been reported in Nigeria and Senegal.
LiveScience.com, Tue, 30 Sep 2014 23:43:07 GMT

Ebola Update: 1st Case Diagnosed in the US
A man in Texas is the first person to be diagnosed with Ebola in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
LiveScience.com, Tue, 30 Sep 2014 23:43:07 GMT

Half of Earth's Wildlife Lost Since 1970, Report Finds
The number of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish on Earth dropped by 52 percent from 1970 to 2010, according to the World Wildlife Fund's newly released Living Planet Report.
LiveScience.com, Tue, 30 Sep 2014 23:43:07 GMT

Study says hepatitis C will be a rare disease by about 2036
Hepatitis C, a major infectious disease in the United States with 180 million cases worldwide, will likely become a rare disease by about 2036, according to a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health analysis.
Medical Xpress - spotlight medical and health news stories, Tue, 30 Sep 2014 22:59:26 GMT

Researchers show EEG's potential to reveal depolarizations following TBI
The potential for doctors to measure damaging "brain tsunamis" in injured patients without opening the skull has moved a step closer to reality, thanks to pioneering research at the University of Cincinnati (UC) Neuroscience Institute.
Medical Xpress - spotlight medical and health news stories, Tue, 30 Sep 2014 22:59:26 GMT

Improving babies' language skills before they're even old enough to speak
In the first months of life, when babies begin to distinguish sounds that make up language from all the other sounds in the world, they can be trained to more effectively recognize which sounds "might" be language, accelerating the development of the brain maps which are critical to language acquisition and processing, according to new Rutgers research.
Medical Xpress - spotlight medical and health news stories, Tue, 30 Sep 2014 22:59:26 GMT

Protest halts Nasa spaceflight plans
Nasa is facing a delay to work on two new commercial spacecraft after a formal protest about the contract award process.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Tue, 30 Sep 2014 23:43:07 GMT

Panama opens biodiversity museum
Panama inaugurates a museum designed by world-renowned architect Frank Gehry to celebrate one of the world's richest eco-systems.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Tue, 30 Sep 2014 23:43:07 GMT

Complex molecule discovered in space
The discovery of a branched carbon molecule 27,000 light-years from Earth suggests the building blocks of life may be ubiquitous throughout the galaxy.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Tue, 30 Sep 2014 23:43:07 GMT

An apple a day could keep obesity away
Nondigestible compounds in apples -- specifically, Granny Smith apples -- may help prevent disorders associated with obesity, scientists have concluded. "We know that, in general, apples are a good source of these nondigestible compounds but there are differences in varieties," said the study's lead researcher. "Results from this study will help consumers to discriminate between apple varieties that can aid in the fight against obesity."
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Tue, 30 Sep 2014 23:42:26 GMT

Brief depression questionnaires could lead to unnecessary antidepressant prescriptions
Short questionnaires used to identify patients at risk for depression are linked with antidepressant medications being prescribed when they may not be needed, according to new research. Known as "brief depression symptom measures," the self-administered questionnaires are used in primary care settings to determine the frequency and severity of depression symptoms among patients.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Tue, 30 Sep 2014 23:42:26 GMT

Higher nurse-to-patient standard improves staff safety, study shows
A 2004 California law mandating specific nurse-to-patient staffing standards in acute care hospitals significantly lowered job-related injuries and illnesses for both registered nurses and licensed practical nurses, according to research.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Tue, 30 Sep 2014 23:42:26 GMT

Out in space, the most complex organic molecule yet
The finding suggests an easier path to the formation of life on many planets, the researchers argue.
World Science, Tue, 30 Sep 2014 23:43:08 GMT

An image, or its interpretation? Newfound brain cells show surprising role
Scientists combined images of celebrities to make viewers' brains do a little extra work. Aristotle would have appreciated the results, they say.
World Science, Tue, 30 Sep 2014 23:43:08 GMT

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