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Today's news headlines from the sources selected by our team:

New Diet Book 'Always Hungry?' Renews Debate Over Calories
Do calories count? A new book suggests they're not the only factor when it comes to weight.
LiveScience.com, Tue, 09 Feb 2016 23:47:46 GMT

Marijuana for Menstrual Cramps? New Product Causes Concern
A new product offers marijuana compounds in the form of a vaginal suppository, and its makers claim it can relieve menstrual cramps. But is this product safe?
LiveScience.com, Tue, 09 Feb 2016 23:47:46 GMT

'Love Hormone' Could Predict Whether Mom and Dad Stay Together
Low oxytocin levels during early pregnancy and in the early postpartum period might hint at relationship struggles for new moms.
LiveScience.com, Tue, 09 Feb 2016 23:47:46 GMT

Bacteria 'see' like tiny eyeballs
Biologists discover how bacteria sense light and move towards it: the entire single-cell organism focuses light like a tiny eyeball.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Tue, 09 Feb 2016 23:47:46 GMT

Water rights 'threaten Spanish wetland'
One of Europe's most important wetland areas is under threat say environmentalists as Spain and Catalonia argue about the future of the Ebro river.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Tue, 09 Feb 2016 23:47:46 GMT

India 'meteorite death' to be probed
Indian scientists have been asked to examine claims that a man died after being hit by a meteorite in southern Vellore city.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Tue, 09 Feb 2016 23:47:46 GMT

Engineering researchers use laser to 'weld' neurons, creating new medical research possibilities
A research team based in the University of Alberta Faculty of Engineering has developed a method of connecting neurons, using ultrashort laser pulses—a breakthrough technique that opens the door to new medical research and treatment opportunities.
Medical Xpress - latest medical and health news stories, Wed, 10 Feb 2016 00:24:07 GMT

Common gene variant influences food choices
If you're fat, can you blame it on your genes? The answer is a qualified yes. Maybe. Under certain circumstances. Researchers are moving towards a better understanding of some of the roots of obesity.
Medical Xpress - latest medical and health news stories, Wed, 10 Feb 2016 00:24:07 GMT

'Brain road maps' reflect behavior differences between males and females
Differences in the neural wiring across development of men and women across ages, matched behavioral differences commonly associated with each of the sexes, according to an imaging-based study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania published February 1 in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B.
Medical Xpress - latest medical and health news stories, Wed, 10 Feb 2016 00:24:07 GMT

Common gene variant influences food choices ... for better or worse
Scientists have recently discovered that for girls who are carriers of a particular gene variant (DRD4 VNTR with 7 repeats), the crucial element that influences a child's fat intake is not the gene variant itself. Instead, it is the interplay between the gene and girls' early socioeconomic environment that may determine whether they have increased fat intake or healthier than average eating compared to their peers from the same class background.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Tue, 09 Feb 2016 23:47:46 GMT

New thin film transistor may lead to flexible devices
An engineering research team has invented a new transistor that could revolutionize thin-film electronic devices.Their findings could open the door to the development of flexible electronic devices with applications as wide-ranging as display technology to medical imaging and renewable energy production.The transistor is easily scaled and has power-handling capabilities at least 10 times greater than commercially produced thin film transistors.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Tue, 09 Feb 2016 23:47:46 GMT

Behind the levees: Flood risk can be higher with levees than without them
The long-term damage of levees can be far worse for those living behind them than if those levees were not there, a case study of the Sny Island levee district found.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Tue, 09 Feb 2016 23:47:46 GMT

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