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Today's news headlines from the sources selected by our team:

Images of Warming: National Parks in 2050 Posters
A series of posters by artist Hannah Rothstein show how U.S. National Park might look by 2050 if climate change isn't mitigated.
Live Science, Tue, 25 Apr 2017 16:23:11 GMT

Why Can't You Shake Hands with a Robot?
For robots to be most useful when working alongside humans, we'll have to figure out how to make robots that can literally lend us a hand when our own two are not enough.
Live Science, Tue, 25 Apr 2017 16:23:11 GMT

Make Mars Livable with Asteroids: Researchers Propose Terraforming Plan
A new plan for the "terraformation" of Mars has been scripted by a research team – a blueprint for the red planet to terraform a site on Mars in 2036.
Live Science, Tue, 25 Apr 2017 16:23:11 GMT

Family tree of dogs reveals secret history of canines
The largest family tree of dog ever assembled shows how dogs evolved into more than 150 modern breeds.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Tue, 25 Apr 2017 16:23:11 GMT

Iceberg 'doodles' trace climate history
Scientists publish a new atlas of the poles, detailing the sometimes strange shapes on the ocean floor.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Tue, 25 Apr 2017 16:23:11 GMT

'World's oldest fungus' raises evolution questions
Fossils found in rock from beneath the sea may be the oldest known fungi by one to two billion years.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Tue, 25 Apr 2017 16:23:11 GMT

Wax Moth Caterpillars Found to Eat Polyethylene
An international team of researchers from Spain and the United Kingdom has found that a caterpillar of the greater wax moth (Galleria mellonella) — commonly known as a wax worm — has the ability to biodegrade polyethylene. Polyethylene is the most commonly used plastic in the world: about 80 million tons are made annually. It [...]
Breaking Science News | Sci-News.com, Tue, 25 Apr 2017 16:23:11 GMT

Physical Activity Can Lower Risk of Heart Damage, Says New Study
According to a new study, physical activity can lower the risk of myocardial damage in middle-aged and older adults and reduce the levels of myocardial damage in people who are obese. “Physical activity is associated with reduced risk of heart failure, particularly among obese people,” the team behind the study said. “Heart failure may be [...]
Breaking Science News | Sci-News.com, Tue, 25 Apr 2017 16:23:11 GMT

Solar System’s Heliosphere Much More Compact, Rounded than Previously Thought
Many stars show tails that trail behind them like a comet’s tail, supporting the idea that our own Solar System has one too. However, new evidence from NASA’s Cassini, Voyager and Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) missions suggests that the trailing end of the Solar System may not be stretched out in a long tail. The [...]
Breaking Science News | Sci-News.com, Tue, 25 Apr 2017 16:23:11 GMT

Yoga may have health benefits for people with chronic non-specific lower back pain
A new systematic review, published in the Cochrane Library today, suggests that yoga may lead to a reduction in pain and functional ability in people with chronic non-specific lower back pain over the short term, compared with no exercise. However, researchers advise that more studies are needed to provide information on long-term effects.
Medical Xpress - latest medical and health news stories, Thu, 12 Jan 2017 10:57:33 GMT

Study first to connect stress-associated brain activity with cardiovascular risk
A study led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISSMS) investigators has linked, for the first time in humans, activity in a stress-sensitive structure within the brain to the risk of subsequent cardiovascular disease. The team's findings, being published in the journal The Lancet, also reveals a pathway leading from activation of that structure—the amygdala—through elevated immune system activity to an increased incidence of cardiovascular events.
Medical Xpress - latest medical and health news stories, Thu, 12 Jan 2017 10:57:33 GMT

Study explains how western diet leads to overeating and obesity
More than two in three adults in the United States are considered overweight or obese, with substantial biomedical and clinical evidence suggesting that chronic overconsumption of a "western diet" - foods consisting high levels of sugars and fats - is a major cause of this epidemic.
Medical Xpress - latest medical and health news stories, Thu, 12 Jan 2017 10:57:33 GMT

When artificial intelligence evaluates chess champions
The ELO system, which most chess federations use today, ranks players by the results of their games. Although simple and efficient, it overlooks relevant criteria such as the quality of the moves players actually make. To overcome these limitations, Reseachers have now developed a new system.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Tue, 25 Apr 2017 16:23:11 GMT

Modeling reveals how policy affects adoption of solar energy photovoltaics in California
Researchers inspired by efforts to promote green energy, are exploring the factors driving commercial customers in Southern California, both large and small, to purchase and install solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. They built a model for commercial solar PV adoption to quantify the impact of government incentives and solar PV costs.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Tue, 25 Apr 2017 16:23:11 GMT

Facebook can function as safety net for the bereaved
Neuroscientists have long noted that if certain brain cells are destroyed by, say, a stroke, new circuits may be laid in another location to compensate, essentially rewiring the brain. Researchers have found that social networks respond similarly after the death of a close mutual friend, providing support during the grieving process.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Tue, 25 Apr 2017 16:23:11 GMT

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