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Today's Highlights
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Today's news headlines from the sources selected by our team:

Chasing Alligators, Dodging Parrots: A Zoo Keeper's Life (Op-Ed)
What scares a zoo keeper may not be what you expect.
LiveScience.com, Thu, 24 Jul 2014 09:49:02 GMT

More Efficient, Durable Solar Cells are Possible Thanks to Glass (Op-Ed)
Self-cooling, longer lasting and more efficient solar cells are within reach simply by adding a thin layer of glass.
LiveScience.com, Thu, 24 Jul 2014 09:49:02 GMT

Clean Energy, Batteries Not Included (Op-Ed)
Green energy doesn't need to wait for next-gen battery storage.
LiveScience.com, Thu, 24 Jul 2014 09:49:02 GMT

Using media as a stress reducer can lead to feelings of guilt and failure
It seems common practice. After a long day at work, sometimes you just want to turn on the TV or play a video game to relax, decompress. This is supposed to make you feel better. But, a recent study published in the Journal of Communication, by researchers at the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany, and VU University Amsterdam, found that people who had high stress levels after work and engaged in television viewing or video game play didn't feel relaxed or recovered, but had high levels of guilt and feelings of failure.
Medical Xpress - spotlight medical and health news stories, Thu, 24 Jul 2014 10:39:09 GMT

Newly discovered gut virus lives in half the world's population
Odds are, there's a virus living inside your gut that has gone undetected by scientists for decades. A new study led by researchers at San Diego State University has found that more than half the world's population is host to a newly described virus, named crAssphage, which infects one of the most common types of gut bacteria, Bacteroidetes. This phylum of bacteria is thought to be connected with obesity, diabetes and other gut-related diseases. The research appears today in Nature Communications.
Medical Xpress - spotlight medical and health news stories, Thu, 24 Jul 2014 10:39:09 GMT

New device detects deadly lung disease
A scientist from the University of Exeter has developed a simple, cheap and highly accurate device for diagnosing a frequently fatal lung disease which attacks immune deficient individuals such as cancer patients and bone marrow transplant recipients.
Medical Xpress - spotlight medical and health news stories, Thu, 24 Jul 2014 10:39:09 GMT

Dogs 'hardwired' to be jealous wags
Jealousy is not just part of the human condition, a study suggests, it appears to be hard wired into the brains of dogs too.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Thu, 24 Jul 2014 09:49:02 GMT

Fur seals feel climate impacts
Changes in the Antarctic climate are showing up in the fur seal population, say scientists who have studied the animals for 30 years on the British Overseas Territory of South Georgia.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Thu, 24 Jul 2014 09:49:02 GMT

Genetic clues to age of first period
The timing of when a girl reaches puberty is controlled by hundreds of genes, say scientists.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Thu, 24 Jul 2014 09:49:02 GMT

Smarter than a first-grader? Crows can perform as well as 7- to 10-year-olds on cause-and-effect water displacement tasks
In Aesop's fable about the crow and the pitcher, a thirsty bird happens upon a vessel of water, but when he tries to drink from it, he finds the water level out of his reach. Not strong enough to knock over the pitcher, the bird drops pebbles into it -- one at a time -- until the water level rises enough for him to drink his fill. New research demonstrates the birds' intellectual prowess may be more fact than fiction.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Thu, 24 Jul 2014 09:49:02 GMT

Is your data safe? Why you should care more about spam
Researchers are working to protect consumer data by using companies spam volume to evaluate its security vulnerability through the SpamRankings.net project.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Thu, 24 Jul 2014 09:49:02 GMT

Medical student perceptions of health policy education improving, but 40% are still not satisfied, study shows
Students graduating from U.S. medical schools in 2012 feel they’ve received a better education in health policy issues than graduates surveyed in 2008, according to a multi-center study. The study applied a new framework for teaching and evaluating perceptions of training in health policy, first proposed by the authors in a 2011 perspective.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Thu, 24 Jul 2014 09:49:02 GMT

Study: We could detect aliens by their pollution
Research suggests we could spot the fingerprints of certain common pollutants.
World Science, Thu, 24 Jul 2014 10:18:56 GMT

Don't tell kids how healthy any food is, study suggests
According to a new study, when children hear about the benefits of healthy food, they're less likely to eat it.
World Science, Thu, 24 Jul 2014 10:18:56 GMT

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