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Today's Highlights
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Today's news headlines from the sources selected by our team:

Invasive Camel Crickets Widespread in US Homes
An invasive species of camel cricket from Asia is now far more common in American basements than the native variety, a citizen science project found.
LiveScience.com, Tue, 02 Sep 2014 18:29:08 GMT

7 Awesome Discoveries Made by Kids
These seven kids prove that grown-ups aren't the only ones who can discover cool stuff.
LiveScience.com, Tue, 02 Sep 2014 18:29:08 GMT

425-Pound Gorilla Breathes Easy After Sinus Surgery
For the first time in weeks, a gorilla with a nasty sinus infection is breathing through his nose again.
LiveScience.com, Tue, 02 Sep 2014 18:29:08 GMT

Early cerebellum injury hinders neural development, possible root of autism
A brain region largely known for coordinating motor control has a largely overlooked role in childhood development that could reveal information crucial to understanding the onset of autism, according to Princeton University researchers.
Medical Xpress - spotlight medical and health news stories, Tue, 02 Sep 2014 18:24:57 GMT

Salamander skin peptide promotes quick and effective wound healing in mice
Move over antibiotic ointment, there might be a new salve to dominate medicine cabinets of the future, and it comes from an unlikely placeā€”the lowly salamander. Salamanders may not be the cuddliest of animals, but they can regenerate lost limbs and achieve amazing recovery of seriously damaged body parts. Now, a new report published in the September 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal, identifies a small protein (called a "peptide") from the skin of salamanders that may be the key to unlocking the secret of this amazing wound healing trick in humans.
Medical Xpress - spotlight medical and health news stories, Tue, 02 Sep 2014 18:24:57 GMT

Scientists devise a bar code for the bacteria that causes tuberculosis
Doctors and researchers will be able to easily identify different types of tuberculosis (TB) thanks to a new genetic barcode devised by scientists from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.
Medical Xpress - spotlight medical and health news stories, Tue, 02 Sep 2014 18:24:57 GMT

Monkey leaders have different brains
Neuroscientists discover that primate brains show consistent differences according social status
BBC News - Science & Environment, Tue, 02 Sep 2014 18:29:08 GMT

Rosetta set for 'capture' manoeuvres
The Rosetta probe is about to begin the manoeuvres that will take it properly into orbit around Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Tue, 02 Sep 2014 18:29:08 GMT

Africa's farmers face failed seasons
African farmers face 'failed seasons' risk as a result of being overwhelmed by climate change, warns a status report on the continent's agriculture.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Tue, 02 Sep 2014 18:29:08 GMT

Family dinners good for teens' mental health, could protect from cyberbullying
Cyberbullying was associated with mental health and substance use problems in adolescents, a new study shows, but family dinners may help protect teens from the consequences of cyberbullying and also be beneficial for their mental health.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Tue, 02 Sep 2014 17:56:53 GMT

Quality of US diet improves, gap widens for quality between rich and poor
The quality of the US diet showed some modest improvement in the last decade in large measure because of a reduction in the consumption of unhealthy trans fats, but the gap in overall diet quality widened between the rich and the poor.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Tue, 02 Sep 2014 17:56:53 GMT

Viewers eat more while watching Hollywood action flick on TV
Television shows filled with action and sound may be bad for your waistline. TV viewers ate more M&Ms, cookies, carrots and grapes while watching an excerpt from a Hollywood action film than those watching an interview program.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Tue, 02 Sep 2014 17:56:53 GMT

Cutting carbs may beat cutting fat
A study suggests people could reduce their weight and heart disease risk without a low-fat diet.
World Science, Tue, 02 Sep 2014 18:12:14 GMT

Training might teach the brain to prefer healthy food
It may be possible to train the brain to prefer healthy low-calorie foods over unhealthy higher-calorie foods, research suggests.
World Science, Tue, 02 Sep 2014 18:12:14 GMT

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