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Bioscience News
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Today's biological science headlines from the sources selected by our team:

Why bees soared and slime flopped as inspirations for systems engineering
Honeybees gathering nectar inspired an algorithm that eased the burden of host servers handling unpredictable traffic by about 25 percent. Nature can inspire some great engineering, but it can also lead to some flops. Take slime mold: Standard algorithms beat it hands down to model connectivity.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Mon, 19 Feb 2018 01:49:16 GMT

Studying mitosis' structure to understand the inside of cancer cells
Cell division is an intricately choreographed ballet of proteins and molecules that divide the cell. During mitosis, microtubule-organizing centers assemble the spindle fibers that separate the copying chromosomes of DNA. While scientists are familiar with MTOCs' existence and the role they play in cell division, their actual physical structure remains poorly understood. Researchers are now trying to decipher their molecular architecture.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Mon, 19 Feb 2018 01:49:16 GMT

What makes circadian clocks tick?
Circadian clocks arose as an adaptation to dramatic swings in daylight hours and temperature caused by the Earth's rotation, but we still don't fully understand how they work. Scientists studying the circadian clock of blue-green colored cyanobacteria. The group discovered that how the proteins move hour by hour is central to cyanobacteria's circadian clock function.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Mon, 19 Feb 2018 01:49:16 GMT

The new bioenergy research center: building on ten years of success
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) The Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC), led by the University of Wisconsin-Madison, recently embarked on a new mission: to develop sustainable alternatives to transportation fuels and products currently derived from petroleum.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Mon, 19 Feb 2018 01:49:16 GMT

Why bees soared and slime flopped as inspirations for systems engineering
(Georgia Institute of Technology) Honeybees gathering nectar inspired an algorithm that eased the burden of host servers handling unpredictable traffic by about 25 percent. Nature can inspire some great engineering, but it can also lead to some flops. Take slime mold: Standard algorithms beat it hands down to model connectivity. AAAS annual meeting presentation by systems researcher Craig Tovey.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Mon, 19 Feb 2018 01:49:16 GMT

Using mutant bacteria to study how changes in membrane proteins affect cell functions
(Biophysical Society) Phospholipids are water insoluble "building blocks" that define the membrane barrier surrounding cells and provide the structural scaffold and environment where membrane proteins reside. During the 62nd Biophysical Society Annual Meeting, held Feb. 17-21, William Dowhan from the University of Texas-Houston McGovern Medical School will present his group's work exploring how the membrane protein phospholipid environment determines its structure and function.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Mon, 19 Feb 2018 01:49:16 GMT

The proteins that domesticated our genomes

EPFL scientists have carried out a genomic and evolutionary study of a large and enigmatic family of human proteins, to demonstrate that it is responsible for harnessing the millions of transposable elements in the human genome. The work reveals the largely species-specific gene-regulatory networks that impact all of human biology, in both health and disease.

Biology News Net, Mon, 19 Feb 2018 01:49:16 GMT

Human kidney progenitors isolated, offering new clues to cell renewal

In a first-of-its-kind look at human kidney development, researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles have isolated human nephron progenitor (NP) cells. Their results, published online in the journal Stem Cell Translational Medicine, will help scientists understand how these progenitor cells become renal cells in the developing fetus, and possibly offer a future way to foster renal regeneration after chronic kidney failure or acute injury.

Biology News Net, Mon, 19 Feb 2018 01:49:16 GMT

Study reveals how ionising radiation damages DNA and causes cancer

For the first time, researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators have been able to identify in human cancers two characteristic patterns of DNA damage caused by ionising radiation. These fingerprint patterns may now enable doctors to identify which tumours have been caused by radiation, and investigate if they should be treated differently.

Biology News Net, Mon, 19 Feb 2018 01:49:16 GMT

International collaboration working to enhance protections for spinner dolphins
An international study involving researchers from Western Australia and the United States has unlocked a key behavioural schedule in spinner dolphins, which could provide crucial insight to conservation measures for the free-ranging animals.
Biology News - Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Fri, 13 Jan 2017 14:48:20 GMT

Video: Tracking data and shark behaviour
Animals often share space as they move through their environment. Capturing these aggregations and co-occurrence events has proven extremely difficult in elusive, wide-ranging animals.
Biology News - Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Fri, 13 Jan 2017 14:48:20 GMT

Tremors in newborn piglets attributed to previously unidentified virus
Symptoms of tremors and shaking in newborn piglets are not a sign that the animals are cold, but rather that they are suffering from a specific viral infection. Researchers at Vetmeduni Vienna have now been able to prove this correlation for the first time using a newly developed test. The scientists detected a previously unknown virus, termed atypical porcine pestivirus (APPV), in "shaking piglets", making it possible to clearly diagnose the potentially fatal disease. The virus remains in the animals for a long time following an infection and may also be transmitted sexually. The findings were published in the journal Veterinary Research.
Biology News - Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Fri, 13 Jan 2017 14:48:20 GMT

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SciCentral picks

The top 5 resources
selected by our team
for biological science
news coverage:


EurekAlert!
rank:1
white line spacer BiologyNewsNet
rank:2
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Science Daily
rank:3
white line spacer The Scientist
rank:4
white line spacer BioSpace
rank:5
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