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Editors' Picks:



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Bioscience News
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Today's biological science headlines from the sources selected by our team:

Scientists decipher the nanoscale architecture of a beetle's shell
A professor of mechanical and materials engineering has found a way to analyze the fibrous nanostructure of a beetle's lightweight but durable shell.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Thu, 23 Feb 2017 08:51:01 GMT

Scientists discover how essential methane catalyst is made
New ways to convert carbon dioxide (CO2) into methane gas for energy use are a step closer after scientists discovered how bacteria make a component that facilitates the process. Recycling CO2 into energy has immense potential for making these emissions useful rather than a major factor in global warming. However, because the bacteria that can convert CO2 into methane, methanogens, are notoriously difficult to grow, their use in gas production remains limited.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Thu, 23 Feb 2017 08:51:01 GMT

Hidden no more: First-ever global view of transshipment in commercial fishing industry
A new report released today presents the first global map of transshipment, a major pathway for illegally caught and unreported fish to enter the seafood market. Also associated with drug smuggling and slave labor, it is Illegal in many cases, and has been largely invisible until now. Using an artificial intelligence system developed by Global Fishing Watch, data scientists have developed an automated process for identifying and tracking transshipment around the world.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Thu, 23 Feb 2017 08:51:01 GMT

Public lecture on brain fitness, press room, and more: CNS 2017 only 4 weeks away
(Cognitive Neuroscience Society) The CNS 2017 conference - only 4 weeks away - will bring together more than 1,500 scientists at the Hyatt Regency in San Francisco from March 25-28. They will discuss the latest neuroscience research on memory, language, aging, attention, and learning - in 50+ talks and 1,000+ posters. Kicking off the conference will be Adam Gazzaley, a neuroscientist at the University of California, San Francisco, discussing his work on cognitive enhancement.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Thu, 23 Feb 2017 08:51:01 GMT

Oil and gas wastewater spills alter microbes in West Virginia waters
(Rutgers University) Wastewater from oil and gas operations -- including fracking for shale gas -- at a West Virginia site altered microbes downstream, according to a Rutgers-led study. The study, published recently in Science of the Total Environment, showed that wastewater releases, including briny water that contained petroleum and other pollutants, altered the diversity, numbers and functions of microbes. The shifts in the microbial community indicated changes in their respiration and nutrient cycling, along with signs of stress.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Thu, 23 Feb 2017 08:51:01 GMT

Researchers ponder the shape of birds' eggs
(Wiley) The shape of birds' eggs varies considerably, for reasons that are unclear.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Thu, 23 Feb 2017 08:51:01 GMT

Human kidney progenitors isolated, offering new clues to cell renewal

In a first-of-its-kind look at human kidney development, researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles have isolated human nephron progenitor (NP) cells. Their results, published online in the journal Stem Cell Translational Medicine, will help scientists understand how these progenitor cells become renal cells in the developing fetus, and possibly offer a future way to foster renal regeneration after chronic kidney failure or acute injury.

Biology News Net, Thu, 23 Feb 2017 08:51:01 GMT

Study reveals how ionising radiation damages DNA and causes cancer

For the first time, researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators have been able to identify in human cancers two characteristic patterns of DNA damage caused by ionising radiation. These fingerprint patterns may now enable doctors to identify which tumours have been caused by radiation, and investigate if they should be treated differently.

Biology News Net, Thu, 23 Feb 2017 08:51:01 GMT

Giraffes more speciose than expected

Scientists from the Senckenberg and the Giraffe Conservation Foundation have analysed the genetic relationships of all major populations of giraffe in the wild. The large study on the genetic makeup of giraffe, published today in Current Biology, shows that there are four distinct giraffe species. Until now, only one giraffe species had been recognized. The unexpected results are based on analyses using several nuclear marker genes of more than 100 animals. The new insights are set to improve protection efforts of these endangered animals in Africa.

Biology News Net, Thu, 23 Feb 2017 08:51:01 GMT

International collaboration working to enhance protections for spinner dolphins
An international study involving researchers from Western Australia and the United States has unlocked a key behavioural schedule in spinner dolphins, which could provide crucial insight to conservation measures for the free-ranging animals.
Biology News - Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Fri, 13 Jan 2017 14:48:20 GMT

Video: Tracking data and shark behaviour
Animals often share space as they move through their environment. Capturing these aggregations and co-occurrence events has proven extremely difficult in elusive, wide-ranging animals.
Biology News - Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Fri, 13 Jan 2017 14:48:20 GMT

Tremors in newborn piglets attributed to previously unidentified virus
Symptoms of tremors and shaking in newborn piglets are not a sign that the animals are cold, but rather that they are suffering from a specific viral infection. Researchers at Vetmeduni Vienna have now been able to prove this correlation for the first time using a newly developed test. The scientists detected a previously unknown virus, termed atypical porcine pestivirus (APPV), in "shaking piglets", making it possible to clearly diagnose the potentially fatal disease. The virus remains in the animals for a long time following an infection and may also be transmitted sexually. The findings were published in the journal Veterinary Research.
Biology News - Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Fri, 13 Jan 2017 14:48:20 GMT

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SciCentral picks

The top 5 resources
selected by our team
for biological science
news coverage:


EurekAlert!
rank:1
white line spacer BiologyNewsNet
rank:2
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Science Daily
rank:3
white line spacer The Scientist
rank:4
white line spacer BioSpace
rank:5
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