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Engineering News
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Today's engineering headlines from the sources selected by our team:

3-D scans for the automotive industry
How does an automotive assembly line have to be retrofitted for a change of model? 3-D scanners are an elegant way to find this out. Professor of computer science, Andreas NĂĽchter, is a specialist for the job.
Engineering Technology News - Engineering News, Technology News, Technology, Engineering , Sat, 14 Jan 2017 05:42:33 GMT

First 3-D platform for simulating zebrafish behavior may replace animals in some research
Every year, approximately 20 million animals are used in scientific research. Increasingly these animals are zebrafish, which are quickly eclipsing rodents and primates as a favored species in biomedical research because of their genetic similarity to humans and their versatility. However, concerns voiced by policymakers, citizens, and scientific authorities about the number of animals used in experiments have led researchers to explore alternative, computer-based methodologies that could help reduce animal usage without compromising results.
Engineering Technology News - Engineering News, Technology News, Technology, Engineering , Sat, 14 Jan 2017 05:42:33 GMT

BLAST: Greater speed, accuracy in recognizing brain injury
Modern body armor better protects warfighters against shrapnel from explosive blasts. However, they still face a hidden threat—the resulting blast pressure and shock wave that could cause traumatic brain injury (TBI).
Engineering Technology News - Engineering News, Technology News, Technology, Engineering , Sat, 14 Jan 2017 05:42:33 GMT

Hunting for the finest droplet
Modern passenger airplanes already consume less than three liters fuel per one hundred kilometers and passenger. Scientists are currently working on further improving this value. In addition, engineers plan to optimize the combustion process such that exhaust gas emission is reduced considerably. For this purpose, they use supercomputers and simulation methods that are usually applied for tsunami calculations or for water effects in computer games.
Matter & Energy News -- ScienceDaily, Thu, 23 Nov 2017 23:18:20 GMT

Highly charged molecules behave paradoxically
Chemistry researchers have now discovered how certain small biomolecules attach to one another. The researchers’ study also overturns the standard picture – particles with the same electrical charge appear to be drawn together and not vice versa. The results may be important for the development of new drugs.
Matter & Energy News -- ScienceDaily, Thu, 23 Nov 2017 23:18:20 GMT

China's reversing emission flows revealed by research
The flow of China's carbon emissions has reversed, according to new research. The study estimates the carbon implications of recent changes in the country's economic development patterns and role in international trade since the global financial crisis.
Matter & Energy News -- ScienceDaily, Thu, 23 Nov 2017 23:18:20 GMT

Toyota Gets Back Into Humanoid Robots With New T-HR3
It's been about a decade, but Toyota is finally doing humanoid robots again

It's been about a decade, but Toyota is finally doing humanoid robots again
IEEE Spectrum Recent Content, Thu, 23 Nov 2017 23:18:20 GMT

Can Tech Moguls Cure What Ails Medicine?
A dash of start-up moxie could speed up biomedical innovation

A dash of start-up moxie could speed up biomedical innovation
IEEE Spectrum Recent Content, Thu, 23 Nov 2017 23:18:20 GMT

Awash in Artificial Light, the World Gets 2 Percent Brighter Each Year
Making outdoor lighting more efficient doesn't reduce light pollution—it encourages people to use more light

Making outdoor lighting more efficient doesn't reduce light pollution—it encourages people to use more light
IEEE Spectrum Recent Content, Thu, 23 Nov 2017 23:18:20 GMT

NUST MISIS metallurgists were the first to develop a unique furnace for the recycling of waste
(National University of Science and Technology MISIS) More than 95% of cast-iron in the world is still produced in blast furnaces. Modern blast furnaces are powerful units that produce tons of cast-iron daily, but they require prepared, high-quality raw materials like agglomerate cakes, steel pellets, and iron. Recycling industrial waste that contains iron (of which Russian enterprises alone produce more than 5 million tons of annually) is economically and technologically irresponsible and next-to-impossible in blast furnaces.
EurekAlert! - Technology, Engineering and Computer Science, Thu, 23 Nov 2017 23:18:20 GMT

New batteries with better performance and improved safety
(Université de Genève) Currently the most important technology for batteries is the lithium-ion battery technology: but the technology is expensive and contains a flammable liquid. To satisfy the growing demand from emerging markets, researchers from Empa and UNIGE have devised a new battery prototype: known as "all-solid-state", this battery has the potential to store more energy while maintaining high safety and reliability levels. Furthermore, the battery is based on sodium, a cheap alternative to lithium.
EurekAlert! - Technology, Engineering and Computer Science, Thu, 23 Nov 2017 23:18:20 GMT

Physicists develop faster way to make Bose-Einstein condensates
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT physicists have invented a new technique to cool atoms into condensates, which is faster than the conventional method and conserves a large fraction of the original atoms. The team used a new process of laser cooling to cool a cloud of rubidium atoms all the way from room temperature to 1 microkelvin, or less than one-millionth of a degree above absolute zero.
EurekAlert! - Technology, Engineering and Computer Science, Thu, 23 Nov 2017 23:18:20 GMT

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