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Editors' Picks:



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Earth & Space News
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Today's earth & space headlines from the sources selected by our team:

Signs of Europa plumes remain elusive in search of Cassini data
A fresh look at data collected by NASA's Cassini spacecraft during its 2001 flyby of Jupiter shows that Europa's tenuous atmosphere is even thinner than previously thought and also suggests that the thin, hot gas around the moon does not show evidence of plume activity occurring at the time of the flyby. The new research provides a snapshot of Europa's state of activity at that time, and suggests that if there is plume activity, it is likely intermittent.
Space & Time News -- ScienceDaily, Sun, 21 Dec 2014 18:34:49 GMT

NASA's Kepler reborn, makes first exoplanet find of new mission
NASA's planet-hunting Kepler spacecraft makes a comeback with the discovery of the first exoplanet found using its new mission -- K2. The discovery was made when astronomers and engineers devised an ingenious way to repurpose Kepler for the K2 mission and continue its search of the cosmos for other worlds.
Space & Time News -- ScienceDaily, Sun, 21 Dec 2014 18:34:49 GMT

Dust devil and the details: Spinning up a storm on Mars
Spinning up a dust devil in the thin air of Mars requires a stronger updraft than is needed to create a similar vortex on Earth, researchers show. “To start a dust devil on Mars you need convection, a strong updraft,” said Bryce Williams, an atmospheric science graduate student at UAH. “We looked at the ratio between convection and surface turbulence to find the sweet spot where there is enough updraft to overcome the low level wind and turbulence. And on Mars, where we think the process that creates a vortex is more easily disrupted by frictional dissipation – turbulence and wind at the surface – you need twice as much convective updraft as you do on Earth.”
Space & Time News -- ScienceDaily, Sun, 21 Dec 2014 18:34:49 GMT

Biggest Solar Flares of 2014: Sun Storm Photos
See photos and images of the biggest solar flares of 2014 in this SPACE.com gallery of photos by NASA spacecraft and solar astronomers.
SPACE.com, Sun, 21 Dec 2014 18:34:50 GMT

Active Sun Unleashes Massive Solar Flare
The sun fired off a massive solar flare late Friday (Dec. 19), after days of intense storms from our nearest star. The huge solar flare registered as an X1.8-class event, the most powerful type of flare possible, and was captured on camera by NASA's powe
SPACE.com, Sun, 21 Dec 2014 18:34:50 GMT

Best Space Photos of the Week - Dec. 20, 2014
From holiday lights seen from space to incredible pictures of streaking meteorss, don't miss these amazing space images of the week for Dec. 20, 2014.
SPACE.com, Sun, 21 Dec 2014 18:34:50 GMT

Video gives astronaut's-eye view inside NASA's Orion spacecraft
New video recorded during the return of NASA's Orion through Earth's atmosphere this month provides a taste of the intense conditions the spacecraft and the astronauts it carries will endure when they return from deep space destinations on the journey to Mars.
Phys.org: Astronomy & Space News, Sun, 21 Dec 2014 18:34:50 GMT

SDO captures images of two mid-level flares
The sun emitted a mid-level flare on Dec. 18, 2014, at 4:58 p.m. EST. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured an image of the event. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however—when intense enough—they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel.
Phys.org: Astronomy & Space News, Sun, 21 Dec 2014 18:34:50 GMT

Why is Venus so horrible?
Venus sucks. Seriously, it's the worst. The global temperature is as hot as an oven, the atmospheric pressure is 90 times Earth, and it rains sulfuric acid. Every part of the surface of Venus would kill you dead in moments.
Phys.org: Astronomy & Space News, Sun, 21 Dec 2014 18:34:50 GMT

After Rosetta, Japanese mission aims for an asteroid in search of origins of Earth's water
The European Space Agency's Rosetta mission to land on comet 67P was one of the most audacious in space history. The idea of landing on a small chunk of icy rock 300m kilometres away from Earth and hurtling towards the sun at speeds approaching 135,000km/hour is incredible – made more so by the fact they actually achieved it.
Phys.org: Astronomy & Space News, Sun, 21 Dec 2014 18:34:50 GMT

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SciCentral picks

The top 5 resources
selected by our team
for earth & space
news coverage:


SpaceRef.com
rank:1
white line spacer SpaceFlight Now
rank:2
white line spacer Space Daily
rank:3
white line spacer Space.com
rank:4
white line spacer Universe Today
rank:5
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